Heart of America Game
Breeders' Association

Lady Amherst Pheasant Standards


This article first appeared in the May 1994 issue of the Heartland News. The Lady Amherst, and its close relative the Golden, are perhaps the two most commonly kept ornamental pheasant. Unfortunately, both of these species have been allowed to interbreed in captivity, this article will help breeders determine the purity of their Lady Amherst stock and what to look for when purchasing future breeders.

Standards for Lady Amherst Pheasant (Chrysolophus ampherstiae)

Description: Cock

HEAD & NECK:

BODY:

WINGS:

TAIL:

LEGS & FEET:

SIZE: 50 to 66 1/2 inches

Common Faults of a Lady Amherst Cock
1. Traces of some color other than green in the crown. The red of the crest should stop precisely where the green begins.
2. Traces of red in the breast or on the flanks.
3. Facial color not bluish-green.
4. Dark gray or brownish color in the white area between the bars on the central rectrices.
5. Broken or mottled barring on the central rectrices.
6. Small size, approaching that of the Goldens.
7. Yellowish legs.

Description: Hen

HEAD & NECK:

BODY:

WINGS:

TAIL:

LEGS & FEET:

SIZE: 26 to 26 3/4 inches (Larger than a Golden hen)

Common Faults of a Lady Amherst Hen
1. Lack of reddish chestnut on the head, neck, throat and upper breast.
2. No gray marking on the tail.
3. Lack of distinct barring on the tail.
4. Yellowish legs.

Body Regions of a Ruffed Pheasant







May 1994 The Heartland News