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Peacock Pheasant --eating eggs
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Appalachian Springs Farm
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 5:57 pm    Post subject: Peacock Pheasant --eating eggs Reply with quote

My greys have decided that they have an appetite for their own eggs-- much to my dismay of course !! I have three pair that have laid this past month 2 eggs each and have lost 5/6 eggs due to eating by both male and female. Any suggestions for curbing their egg appetite would be most appriciated.
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Resolution
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Take a chukar egg and blow the fluid out- mix it with dish soap and windex and then inject it back into the egg.

Meanwhile, what are you feeding them? Where are you feeding them?
Do you have a pet store nearby? My second suggestion is to get a few guineapigs and straight away. The guineapigs sudden presence aught to shock the birds into using elevated nest baskets/boxes- and give them some behavioral enrichment to boot.

Any time a bird begins eating eggs, I wonder what else they have to do - what else do they have to eat?
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wclawrence
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whatever it takes to make them lay in a box off the ground. The guineapig idea sounds perfect. Also, try a glass egg. (or clay or whatever, hard and round and smooth) in the nest. If they peck it and it doesnt crack, that usually helps alot too.

You may need to increase protein and/or add vitamins???? I dont know what you feed, so that may or may not help.
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Appalachian Springs Farm
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Per your advice- they are getting a diet of cat food, wild bird seed and whole grains. They also have continual acces to suet cakes and get meal worms at bi-weekly intervals. 2 of the pairs lay in shelters in the back of their pens, the other pair does have an elevated box in which they use.
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Tjoen
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is the humidity like in your set-up? Very dry? If so, do you have a misting system set up?

I would take away the wild bird seed and replace it with a good quality poultry/gamebird crumble.

You could try increasing the amount of insect protein that they are getting. Crickets, mealworms and minced lean meat.

You could also replace empty eggs with contents blown out and replaced with mustard.
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Resolution
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this a young pair? Do they have an elevated nest box but refuse to use it?

If you can locate some leaf litter- any substrate from the forest I would get four or five wheelbarrows of the material and line the substrate of the aviary with it. Then introduce two bales of straw ( not hay) in the driest corners of the enclosure. Then introduce guineapigs. Move their feeding table to the opposite corner of wherever it is now. Cut back on the grain and increase the cuttlefish pieces mixed into fruit salad. Another thing I would do straight away is get some aquarium snails established in a tank and bring some out every few days in a special bowl with water and gravel- some moss and a few guppies- make certain it is in a non tip dog bowl or something that can't tip over. If the male is young and brash he may be getting himself overworked about the arrival of eggs. This might be momentous for his little brain and he's dragging her into it. The Guineapigs should really help- and lastly- find a few brace of Coturnix quail- that aviary needs to be more stimulating is what I'm thinking. Please keep us informed and good luck.
I had a fireback that was the worst egg eater one year and an intern from Japan took a silver pheasant egg, hollowed it out and mixed the raw egg with dish soap ( orange coloured) and a yellow window cleaner- i think it was citrus windex. He mixed these two together whipped them even- and injected them back into the egg and then refridgerated it for a day. When he put it out it and put it in the nest box it was promptly discovered and half-eaten. He repeated this four or five times until he quit. He now leaves eggs alone when he sees one. I think he might even turn a little green around the gills when he sees one.
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Saqqlain
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
took a silver pheasant egg, hollowed it out and mixed the raw egg with dish soap ( orange coloured) and a yellow window cleaner- i think it was citrus windex. He mixed these two together whipped them even- and injected them back into the egg and then refridgerated it for a day.

Now thats like dealing the problem professionally.
All what we knew here was to through the Ping-Pong balls in the pen and let the birds to fool around with the eggs and the balls! No wonder the solution was never that effective.
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Hugo Barbosa
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a big Problem!!
My experience say that is very dificult to take this behaver from the birds.
When this happens I make more nests (elevated, on the ground....) and with a lots of cover. normaly only the male broke eggs but sometimes the female have the same behaver.
But it's the first time that i eard this from peacocks pheasants!!!!!!
I never had peacock pheasants eating eggs!!
But if you have 3 pairs and all of them eat eggs it's samething that is not OK. you must find what first.

Hugo
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Resolution
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never had this with peacock pheasants either and thinking about it, their bills are not designed for breaking anything open- especially their own eggs. I wonder if you might have a rodent problem- squirrels and rats are both notorious egg eaters and rat snakes will sometimes knock eggs from the nest boxes, breaking them... Perhaps the best thing to do is to put out a rodent trap? Peacock Pheasants' bills are so delicate they can't even utilize a wild bird seed cake - long delicate bill more like a dove in design than a chicken...
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Carl
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have always found any rescued eggs are very viable, indicating that nutrtion is seldom or never a cause.
I have also tried most of what has ben mentioned here over the years (except elevated nests - none of the spcies that I have ever had the problem with even perch, let alone nest in elevtaed spots) and found that almost nothing worked. The only thing that has been very successful has been PBH - made by Intervet - it is an anti-pick and anti- tail-biting aerosol spray, but I am pretty certain that it is no longer made. Sprayed into an empty egg it usually worked,
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jambird
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kermit,
I have seen where you suggested guineapigs several times and am just curious as to what range of temps they can tolerate.

Thanks,
James
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Carl
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Loads of information about temp's gets pased around that is daft. I have kept what must be hundreds over the years and they stay outdoors all year with ease so long as they are dry and you keep groups that can help keep each other warm in particularly cold weather.
-5C should be no problem and once temperatures rise above about 26C or so, they like an ice pack, wrapped in a towel, to lay across and ice cubes to gnaw.
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Hugo Barbosa
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Kermit, I don't see any peacock pheasant brook an egg, even the palawan that is the more "agressive" of all.
it's a possibility the rats or the hen are laying from the pearch and the egg broke into the ground.
Hugo
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Colomb
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peacock pheasants can, will, and do break eggs. I once had a male that would break the egg within a few minutes of the hen laying. I actually found him eating an egg that was still wet with the bloom. I would have to let the male into the aisle in the evening and put him back in with the hen about noon just to be able to get eggs. The male loved it because he got to explore new territory. The hen would batter him each time I let him back in the pen. I guess she was mad at him for staying out all night!
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Appalachian Springs Farm
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sorry to mess up everyone's hypothesis'. -- We were monitoring one pair for the second egg, and within minutes of laying the egg, the hen (not the male) was eating it. The other pair laid both eggs in an elevated nest and we are not sure who the egg eater was-- possibly a rodent but doubtful as it is too cold for snakes, no rats, possibly mice.

Scott- I to know from personal observation that the peacock pheasants can and do eat eggs,

Kermit- have started given them the cranberry dolops that we discussed in the pass, but I do not think the egg eating is from lack of protein. Could it be from the weather and maybe the parents destroying the egg, as not thinking a chick could survive the inclimate conditions?
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